People

Lab Director

Geetha Ramani

Geetha Ramani

Dr. Ramani is an Associate Professor in the Department of human Development and Quantitative Methodology. Before coming to University of Maryland in 2008, Dr. Ramani received her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Pittsburgh and worked as a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Ramani teaches undergraduate and graduate classes in cognitive development. Her research centers around social influences on cognitive development, namely mathematics and problem solving.

Lab Manager

Alaina Wodzinski

Alaina Wodzinski

Alaina is a graduate student in the Master of Clinical Psychological Science Program. She earned her B.A. in Psychology and Medical Anthropology from Case Western Reserve University in 2014. Before coming to the University of Maryland she worked as a Lab Manager for the Coping and Regulation of Environmental Stress Lab at The Pennsylvania State University. Alaina is interested in the development of early childhood interventions to improve children's academic outcomes. 

Graduate Students

Emily Daubert

emily daubert

Emily is a fifth-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology. Prior to entering graduate school, she earned her B.A. in Psychology from Temple University in Philadelphia and worked for two years as a volunteer in the Temple Infant and Child Lab. Emily is interested in the relations between bilingualism, math and memory development, and the ways in which children learn through informal learning activities.

Mary DePascale

Mary DePascale

Mary is a first-year PhD student in the Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology. She earned her B.A. in Psychology from Wesleyan University. Before graduate school, she worked for two years as a research assistant in the Early Childhood Cognition Lab at MIT and as an education intern at the Children’s Museum of NH. Mary is interested in children’s mathematical and social learning, and how children learn through play, games and informal social interactions.

Nicole Scalise

Nicole Scalise

Nicole is a fourth-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology. Prior to returning to school, Nicole earned her Ed.M. in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard and worked for two years as a research and evaluation analyst at Abt Associates in Bethesda. Nicole is interested in children's early understanding of number, including how informal learning activities and interactions with parents and early childhood educators can build their fundational knowledge.