Angela Henneberger
Dr. Angela Henneberger

angela.henneberger@maryland.gov
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Research Assistant Professor & Maryland Longitudinal Data System Center

Student and School Concentrated Poverty in Maryland: What are the Long-term High School, College, and Career Outcomes?


*POSTPONED. More information to follow.*
Lunch begins at 11:45 am
Talk from 12:00-1:00 pm

Prior research indicates that poverty has negative effects on academic and career outcomes, and in the United States, concentrated levels of poverty occur within neighborhoods and subsequently schools. The current study builds on past research in several ways. First, poverty was measured using duration of student poverty in 6th -12th grades to reduce some of the limitations typically associated with using student eligibility for free and reduced price meals (FARMS) as a proxy to measure poverty. Second, multiple membership multilevel modeling was used to account for all schools a student attended between middle and high school. Findings indicated that students with longer durations of poverty performed more poorly on academic and workforce outcomes, compared to similar students with shorter durations of poverty in similar schools. Additionally, students attending schools with concentrated levels of poverty typically performed more poorly on academic and workforce outcomes, compared to similar students in similar schools with lower concentrations of poverty. For some outcomes, the gap in outcome due to race/ethnicity disappeared or even reversed after controlling for student and school concentrated poverty. Policy implications and directions for future research are discussed.