Maryland PDS 2025 Project

Internship Redesign

Project Overview

The Maryland PDS 2025 Project will review exemplars of teacher internships and residencies for the purposes of designing and piloting a Yearlong Teacher Internship. The project also explores the viability of a paid residency option for the Yearlong Teacher Internship. The paid residency option may provide an opportunity for local career changers to enter teaching while receiving financial support during their career transition. The paid residency option builds on the currently structured part-time paid internship model currently offered in a few MCPS schools. The current part-time paid internship model will serve as a starting point for development of the paid residency option of the Yearlong Teacher Residency.

Work Group Members

NAME
ORGANIZATION
TITLE
Lawrence Clark
UMD
Assistant Dean and Associate Professor (Project PI)
Tracy Dunheimer
UMD
Elementary Education Coordinator
Loren Jones
UMD
K-12 PDS Coordinator (Co-chair)
Dawn Martin
UMD
Assistant Clinical Professor
Joel Miller
UMD
Graduate Assistant
Julieta Perez
PGCPS
Supervising Mentor Teacher, PGCPS
Dalilah Gonzalez-Ocasio
PGCPS
Buck Lodge Middle School, PDS Liaison
Eleanor White
PGCPS
Program Coordinator
Elisa Hong
MCPS
IGEER II Innovative Support Teacher
Jennifer Hallmark
MCPS
Farquhar Middle School Staff Development Teacher
Serenity Moore
MCPS
Coordinator, New Employee Onboarding and Induction

Project Overview

The Maryland PDS 2025 Project SMTA is a collaboratively designed and facilitated professional development experience for practicing and potential Supervising Mentor Teachers in four Maryland public schools: Buck Lodge Middle School and High Point High School (Prince George’s County Public Schools); Farquhar Middle School and Olney Elementary School (Montgomery County Public Schools).  

A Supervising Mentor Teacher is defined as a practicing teacher who has one or more UMD educator preparation interns placed in their classroom as a component of the interns’ educator preparation certification program. Collaborators on the design and facilitation of the SMTA include Mentor Teachers, PGCPS and MCPS School Administrators, PGCPCS and MCPS Professional Development Specialists, and University of Maryland faculty.  For the 2020-21 academic year, 20 Mentor Teachers and potential Mentor Teachers (across the four participating schools) convened monthly (virtually) to complete nine SMTA modules.  For the 2021-2022 academic year, SMTA will have 40 participants. Each SMTA module is designed to take approximately three hours to complete (a combination of synchronous and asynchronous activities).

Theory of Mentor Teacher Development and Impact

Supervising Mentor teachers are primary influences on Interns’ perceptions of teaching and Interns’ capacity to create meaningful learning environments in their early years of teaching.  We contend that Supervising Mentor Teachers’ development and impact are driven by a system of interacting belief, relationships, roles, and capacities.  Supervising Mentor teachers deepen their understanding of the relationship between Supervising Mentor Teachers’ belief systems, their mentoring practices, and their informal interactions with Interns. Our Theory of Supervising Mentor Teacher Development and Impact contends that, for high impact on Interns’ preparation to enter the profession, the following Supervising Mentor Teacher development activities should take place: 

  • Supervising Mentor teachers’ examination of their belief systems about the students they teach, their students’ families, and communities served by their school
  • Supervising Mentor teachers’ examination and understanding of Interns' academic,  family, and community histories 
  • Supervising Mentor teachers’ understanding of their critical role as teacher educators, including the realization that they are the primary ambassadors of the teaching profession.
    • Self-awareness and cultural competency
    • Speaking up and responding to prejudice, bias and stereotypes
    • Building alliances
    • Leading beyond the classroom
    • Ongoing reflection and learning
  • Supervising Mentor teachers’ understanding and capacity to employ a range of mentoring practices that can support intern capacity to employ critical practices associated with
    • Planning, instruction and assessment
    • Classroom culture
    • Family and community engagement
  • Supervising Mentor teachers employ tangible and relevant assessment tools to support their interns’ professional, social, and emotional growth on their path to becoming a teacher in contemporary schools.

Maryland PDS 2025 Supervising Mentor Teacher Academy Goals

  1. Critically examine their beliefs and knowledge about their PreK - 12 students’ ways of knowing and learning, families, communities, and histories
  2. Critically examine their beliefs and knowledge about teacher candidates' ways of knowing and learning, families, communities, and histories
  3. Examine and expand their beliefs and knowledge about how teacher candidates can and should be prepared for their first years of teaching
  4. Examine and expand their beliefs and understanding of the critical role of the Mentor Teacher in teacher education programs
  5. Demonstrate the capacity to support teacher candidates' development of their instructional practice
  6. Demonstrate the capacity to support teacher candidates' development of beliefs and practices in establishing a safe and inclusive classroom culture
  7. Demonstrate the capacity to support teacher candidates' development of beliefs and practices focused on family and community engagement
  8. Use data collected from a range of assessment tools to support teacher candidates' preparation

SMTA Module Schedule & Topics

  • Includes ten 1.5 hour professional development workshops once a month between October 2021 and July 2022.
  • Length: Up to 3 hours per month
  • Date and Times: Second Tuesday of the Month from 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm 

SMTA Module Schedule & Topics (2021-2022)

 Session

Topic

1-10/12

Introduction and Orientation

2-11/9

The Supervising Mentor Teacher Role and Critical Self Awareness

3-12/14

Mentoring with Social and Emotional Safety

4-1/11

Mentoring by Example: A Safe & Inclusive Classroom Culture

5-2/8

Mentoring by Example: Planning, Instructional, and Assessment Practices (Part 1)

6-3/8

Mentoring by Example: Planning, Instructional, and Assessment Practices (Part 2)

7-4/5

Mentoring by Example:  Planning, Instructional, and Assessment Practices (Part 3)

8-5/10

Mentoring through Courageous Conversations

9-6/12

Mentoring by Example: Family and Community Engagement

10-7/12

Mentoring through Ongoing Reflection

Work Group Members

NAME
ORGANIZATION
TITLE
Lawrence Clark
UMD
Assistant Dean and Associate Professor (Project PI)
Tracy Dunheimer
UMD
Elementary Education Coordinator
Alison Jovanovic
UMD
Social Studies Education Program Coordinator
Rossina Zamora Liu
UMD
Assistant Clinical Professor
Lijuan Shi
UMD
Graduate Assistant
Eleanor White
PGCPS
Program Coordinator
Nicole Wall
PGCPS
Instructional Specialist
Alexander Schlegel
PGCPS
High Point High School PDS Liaison
Tracey Brown
PGCPS
Supervising Mentor Teacher
LaShelle Ferguson
PGCPS
Supervising Mentor Teacher
Yolanda Stanislaus
MCPS
Director of Dept. of Professional Growth Systems
Asha Jackson
MCPS
Instructional Specialist
Elisa Hong
MCPS
GEER II Innovative Support Teacher
Alison O’Connor
MCPS
Instructional Specialist
Mary Hart
MCPS
Consulting Teacher
Serenity Moore
MCPS
Coordinator, New Employee Onboarding and Induction